In yesterday’s Rainmaking Recommendation, rainmaking trainer and coach, Jaimie Field offers some great advice for how to write in a way that will get you noticed. I’d expand a little bit on what Jaimie has to say by adding that once you start writing, you want to continuously review what you’re writing to see what seems to be of most interest to people (what gets the most shares, comments, engagement) and then to write/produce more of that. Further, once you’ve figured out what your “key” keywords are, you can get a little in depth with Google to identify what the most popular ones are. We could get really into depth about this – and I won’t – but an easy way to see what people might be searching along with your keywords is to start typing them into a Google search – Google with then start to populate the search with the most popular searches. That may give you some additional ideas, both for other keywords to focus on, and for topics that you may want to address in your content. Read what Jaimie has to say for the full context! 

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In the last Rainmaking Recommendation, I provided an infographic which detailed the amount of data/content that is created and posted on the internet every minute of every day.

With all of the videos being uploaded, with all of the blogs posted, with all of the social media being used, how do you get found when someone has a problem that you can solve?

Without going too far into Search Engine Optimization (SEO), which is a topic for people who know far more than I on this subject, the solution is using words and phrases that your potential clients and referral sources are researching when they are seeking an attorney to help them.  These are known as keywords.

Keywords are the way your content gets discovered.

Think of it this way – most people, who are not lawyers, do not search for a “personal injury attorney”.  Instead, they search for a “car accident lawyer” or a “dog bite lawyer”.   People don’t search for “matrimonial attorneys,” they search for “divorce lawyers” or “child custody”.   People don’t search for “Attorney in Pennsylvania.”  Rather, they search for “lawyer in (insert particular town or county).”

When you are first thinking about keywords, it may be difficult to create a list.  Start by answering the questions:

  • “What do you do for a living?”
  • “What problems do I solve?”
  • “What services do I offer?”

However, instead of using legalese, describe it to someone in plain English.  Those are the words you need to begin using in your marketing.

You have to start thinking like the people with whom you want to do business.  Use the language, words and phrase they would look up when they are seeking legal help.    Listen to your prospects and clients and determine how they are defining your practice.

Then, use those words in your content.  When you are writing a blog, creating a video, posting on social media, on your website, use the words they would use.  Use the words and phrases in your blog titles.

That way, when they go to a search engine – Google, Bing, Yahoo! (yes, people are still using Yahoo!) – and type those words, your content is one of the first pieces of information they see.

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Photo of Lindsay Griffiths Lindsay Griffiths

Lindsay Griffiths is the International Lawyers Network’s Executive Director. In this capacity, Ms. Griffiths is responsible for the oversight and management of day-to-day operations of the International Lawyers Network (ILN). She develops strategies and implementation plans to achieve the ILN’s goals, and handles…

Lindsay Griffiths is the International Lawyers Network’s Executive Director. In this capacity, Ms. Griffiths is responsible for the oversight and management of day-to-day operations of the International Lawyers Network (ILN). She develops strategies and implementation plans to achieve the ILN’s goals, and handles recruitment, member retention, and a high level of service to members. She is engaged in the legal industry to stay on top of trends, both in law firms and law firm networks.

In her role as Executive Director, she develops and facilitates relationships among ILN member firm lawyers at 90+ law firms in 67 countries, and seeks opportunities for member firms to build business and relationships, while ensuring member participation in Network events and initiatives. These initiatives include facilitating referrals, the management and execution of the marketing and business development strategy for the Network, which encompasses all communications, push-down efforts, and marketing partnerships, providing support and guidance to the chairs and group leaders for the ILN’s thirteen practice and industry specialty groups, the ILN’s women’s initiative, the ILN’s mentorship program, the management and execution of all ILN conferences, and more.

JD Supra Readers Choice Top Author 2019

During her previous tenure as Director of Global Relationship Management, the ILN has been shortlisted as a Global Law Firm Network of the Year by The Lawyer for 2016 and 2017, and included as a Chambers & Partners Leading Law Firm Network since 2011. She was awarded “Thought Leader of the Year” by the Legal Marketing Association’s New York chapter in 2014 for her substantive contributions to the industry, and was recently included in Clio’s list for “34 People in Legal You Should Follow on Twitter.” She was also chosen for the American Bar Association Journal’s inaugural Web 100‘s Best Law Blogs, where judge Ivy Grey said “This blog is outstanding, thoughtful and useful.” Ms. Griffiths was recently chosen for as a Top Author by JD Supra in their 2019 Readers’ Choice Awards, for the level of engagement and visibility she attained with readers on the topic of marketing & business development. She has been the author of Zen & the Art of Legal Networking since February of 2009.