The ILN’s Corporate Specialty Group is pleased to announce the sixth release of its corporate publication, “Establishing a Business Entity: An International Guide.” This collaborative electronic guide offers a summary of key corporate law principles in more than 40 countries across the globe, serving as a quick, practical reference for those establishing an entity in these jurisdictions.

Our corporate group has once again put together a strong resource for those doing business in their respective jurisdictions. The previous guide has been updated with current figures and regulations, and we have introduced three new jurisdictions in the current guide.
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The ILN is delighted to announce the release of the fifth (and updated) edition of their corporate guide, “Establishing a Business Entity: An International Guide.” This collaborative electronic guide offers a summary of key corporate law principles in 40 countries across the globe (an increase of nine chapters over our 2017 guide), serving as a quick, practical reference for those establishing an entity in these jurisdictions.
To view the guide, please click here: http://bit.ly/ILNCorporate5th


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I am thrilled to announce the fourth release of our Corporate Group’s International Guide, Establishing a Business Entity. This collaborative electronic guide offers a summary of key corporate law principles in 31 countries across the globe, serving as a quick, practical reference for those establishing an entity in these jurisdictions. In 2017, we have

photo-1444653614773-995cb1ef9efaThis guide continues to be a labor of love for us, so I’m excited to announce that our Corporate Specialty Group is releasing their Third Edition of “Establishing a Business Entity In: An International Guide.”

This collaborative electronic guide offers a summary of key corporate law principles in 22 countries across the globe, serving as a quick, practical reference for those establishing an entity in these jurisdictions.

The guide continues our previous efforts to highlight and promote the collaborative efforts and expertise of our corporate lawyers. The group continues to work diligently to update the guide with the latest figures and regulations for their jurisdictions, and we will pursue regular revision and growth of this comprehensive guide to ensure we are providing the most up-to-date information for our firms and their clients.
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iStock_000000865752MediumI’m thrilled to announce that the second edition of our Corporate Group’s “Establishing a Business Entity: An International Guide” is being released today!

This collaborative electronic guide offers a summary of key corporate law principles in 25 countries across the globe, serving as a quick, practical reference for those establishing an entity in these jurisdictions.  

iStock_000000865752MediumI’m delighted that we’re launching our Corporate Group’s first edition of “Establishing a Business Entity In: An International Guide” today!

The collaborative electronic guide provides a summary of key corporate law principles in 18 countries internationally. It is designed to serve as a quick and practical reference for those establishing an entity in these jurisdictions. 

Happy Friday the 13th all! We’ve had some very popular posts this week, and excellent content as always coming from our member firms. So without further ado…

  • Men Must be Allowed the Same Child Care Leave as Women from Epstein Becker & Green: EBG’s Peter Panken and Jennifer Goldman talk us through Ehrhard v. LaHood, to illustrate why employers must have gender-neutral family leave policies. 
     
  • How to Choose a FINRA Arbitration Panel from Epstein Becker & Green: EBG’s latest blog, The Bellwether, has hit the ground running with a number of successful posts. This post from John Fullerton III discusses how to choose a FINRA arbitration panel, and is the first in a series on practices and procedures in employment-related arbitrations before FINRA.
     
  • The Pinning Rules from Davis & Gilbert: Davis & Gilbert discusses Pinterest from a brand perspective, and what brands need to be aware of when using the site.


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Following introductory comments from Alishan Naqvee, comments on the FCPA from Stuart Gerson and the UK Bribery Act from Charles Wander, the group discussed their thoughts on anti-corruption legislation in their own countries. The discussion was quite lengthy, so I’ve broken it up into multiple posts.

Sueli Avellar Fonseca began with comments about Brazil, which she noted is rated highly on the corruption scale. She said that all the public departments and politicians engage in corruption. The government had created a commission to investigate the existence of corruption and their conclusion was that there is no evidence. Despite this, over the last eight years of the current government, they have made approximately 20 commissions and these commissions are all paid duties to vote in favor of the government. 

Stuart commented that this is why a country like Brazil presents huge problems for outside companies doing business there.  Sueli agreed and said that the UK and US authorities don’t care that it’s customary in Brazil to take bribes.  She said that it’s not the government receivers of the bribes who will turn you in, but your competitors. So there is risk.


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So far, we’ve re-capped Alishan Naqvee’s introduction to anti-corruption laws, and Stuart Gerson’s comments on the US’s Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.  Following Stuart’s presentation, the group heard from Charles Wander of Fladgate LLP, who spoke about the new UK Bribery Act.

Charles began by saying that he would give a brief overview of what’s coming on July 1, 2011 in the UK.  As he had mentioned during an earlier session, the firm has been doing some work on this with their clients, trying to understand what the issues might be.  As Stuart had said, this is going to be applied on a worldwide basis, so it will be applied to anyone with any kind of tenuous connection with the UK.  

The UK was not without anti-bribery legislation – through the end of June they would have a piece of legislation dating back to the 19th century. It was ultimately felt that this didn’t have sufficient teeth.  The UK was criticized in 1997 by the OECD when the incoming Labour administration discontinued an investigation into alleged bribery by British Aerospace, as part of the Al Yamamah contracts in Saudi Arabia.  This was heavily criticized as being a decision made for political reasons.


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Yesterday, I shared with you this post re-capping Alishan Naqvee’s introduction to the topic of anti-corruption at our 2011 Annual Meeting.  To follow up on that, we’ll review Stuart Gerson’s (Epstein Becker & Green) comments during the session regarding the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) and its implications for those in the room.  

Stuart provided the attendees with both an article he and a colleague authored on the FCPA, and an overview that their healthcare group had developed.  Stuart said that as Alishan had mentioned, both the FCPA and the new UK Anti-Bribery law are extraterritorial – but not only are they applied overseas throughout the world, but they are also applied against non-US citizens, as long as the commerce that they’re supporting is in the stream of interstate commerce within the US.

So non-US citizens who have never stepped food in the US are subject to the FCPA, which is a criminal statute that has long jail sentences associated with it.  Additionally, they have fines up to $2 million per offense – and an offense is an individual act, so there could be a long series of them that results in the fines adding up to immense sums.  And this is applicable all around the world.


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